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20130201
20130228
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 49
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English 49
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days a? >> i was in lna. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar if i dream about. the happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work with my mom. tavis: it really is mom. since you were last year a few things have happened. you actually won a golden globe for the series. >> which is so amazing. i will say the foreign press and the critics and you, there were so many champions of the show, which was huge for us to find our following and get to the second season. it is a half-hour co
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bernie sanders is the longest serving independence in congress in his third term after 16 years in the house. he is also the new chair of the veterans affairs committee. it is always good to have you on this program. thanks for your time. >> great to be with you. >> let me start with where we are now. we are caught between the president's inauguration day speech and his state of the union address. i want to cover both in just a second and so much more, but let me start with the inauguration speech. this is the first time we have gotten a chance to talk in person. we did not get a chance to talk that day, so let me start by asking your thoughts about the inauguration speech. the media story on the speech was that it was a very liberal, very progressive view the president expressed from what he wanted to get done in the next four years as the longest serving independent, how did you hear the speech. but the phraseology, we have to ask ourselves exactly wh
.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey osborne to this program. he has just released a terrific collection of standards called "a time for love." he is also part of an all-star tour featuring peabo bryson and others, not a bad line up. how is the door going? >> it is going good. it is one of those stores that people are flocking out to sea. you. peabo and freddie with all their hits. we have to cut the showdown, is still long. [laughter] tavis: i have not seen it yet, but i am anxious to see it. what have you decided to cut your hits down to? >> i have to dig deep and go back to a lot of l.t.d. i have more l.t.d. songs and my solo songs, but i try to mix it up pretty good. tavis: can you hear the people in the audience screaming for other songs grew to more cracks they always want something i know i cannot do. [laughter] tavis: because of time? it is not because you cannot do it because of the instrument. there are some artists that as they age, at the pipes just not what
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome aaron neville. he has just released a terrific new cd. it serves as the basis for a pbs concert special. here is a sneak preview of malik true story." i got a girl and ruby is her name ♪ ♪ she don't love me but i love her just the same ♪ ♪ i am going to haunt you ♪will you be mine tavis: i saw the cd. i felt like you have been keeping something from us if this is a true story. what have we been getting all s?e other years chairma >> the first time i wanted to record our wanted to do doo- wop. i even did a doo-wop version of the mickey mouse march. >> why doo-wop? >> doo-wop nurtured me and threw me into who i am. the teacher thought i had a d d. tavis: what is it about the style that resonated in which you? >> i was not king cole, and who sam cooke. doo-wop was something that sued in may. it made everything all right. tavis: you mentioned an icon. since you mentioned him, i read somewhere where allen tried to get you to change t
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: started a successful company is never easy, but it may have seemed impossible for ping fu, growing up under mao, and she was sent to a labor camp, where she adored unspeakable hardships. she knew just three english words into her vocabulary and came with little money in her pocket. my favorite, "hellboy." she found her way into software, starting her own software company called geomagic, which she continues to lead as its ceo, and her new book about her remarkable journey is called "bend, not break: a life in two worlds." it is a pleasure to have you here. >> thank you. tavis: it was 8 when they came to get you. tell us what life was like before mao's call to revolution and you heard that knock on the door. >> i was living with my parents. they were the most loving parents i could have. i was the youngest one of six. i have five siblings. they would play with me all of the time. i would be in the kitchen. my mom likes to cook wonderful meals, and she always says she puts a lot of love in her food. tavis: all right, so you
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so llody price was there from the very beginning of rock- and-roll. his song "lawdy miss clawdy" crashed through barriers, going to mainstream radio. he included in hits like it's a personality" and -- like "personality" and "stagger lee," and he was inducted into the hall of fame. maybe this will jog your memory. ♪ rightreat me what you are doing to made i am going to tell everybody ♪ >> now, wikipedia says you turn 80 in march, and i am looking at you, and that cannot be possible. >> do you know what? it is. tavis: [laughs] the sunday chitlins. you could not be turning 80 in march. >> well, it is true, tavis. and it don't seem like it. it don't feel like it. i have done what i have done all of my life. i love sports, and i am a bowler. tavis: ok, go ahead and brag about your bowling. >> i have got six perfect games. tavis: all right. [laughter] >> it is very difficult. 73 million people bowl every year. on the 2.5% of the people have ever shot a perfect game. tavis: and
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly and the bad but not talk about the significant work done by those who are trying to dig their way out over this hole that so many of all colors find themselves in. your company hopes to try to alleviate this pain and suffering. let me talk to you about what ofm does and get some specifics about the fight back on poverty. >> i appreciate your pain attention to this issue because it is one that often gets lost. opportunity finance network has what is called the community finance development institution
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: martha raddatz is an emmy award winning journalist that serves as the chief global affairs correspondent for abc news that has just launched a new project with yahoo called on the radar. she is a frequent guest and part-time post. she also moderated the vice- presidential debate between joe biden and paul ryan. let me just apologize, just before we can live on the air, the satellite feed took a hit with all the news of the day and the news that will be made tomorrow. martha, thank you for doing this under these difficult situations. you'll be happy to know there is a beautiful picture of you on the screen. >> i don't know how any of that works but i know we will make it work somehow. tavis: come the about this project. >> on the radar is our digital project with yahoo and abc news. it is part of our power players and i think the power players get the 100 million hits a year. it is a real opportunity for me to sit down like you get to do
that it is not really your story. it is a lot of people's story. >> a new pbs documentary premieres tonight telling the story of how women have shaped the united states over the last half century. we will speak with the film's executive producer betsy west. as protests grow in the west bank over the death of a palestinian man inside an israeli prison, we speak with two co-founders and that is for peace. one is palestinian, the other israeli. they reunited after the deaths of their daughters. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. details are slowly emerging on the allegations against u.s. special operations forces that prompted afghan president karzai to order the removal from wardak province. afghan officials said they have received complaints for the past three months that u.s. forces have arrested nine people who have since disappeared. one afghan villagers said her son was taken away and later found dead. >> my son was taken in his body was dropped under a bridge in the river. one of his fingers was cut off. he w
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: david o. russell was up for two oscars next month. it is often hard to quantify the role of director, but getting a good performance of the test is certainly at the top of the list. for the first time since 1981, all four principal actors in this movie are up for an oscar. quite an achievement. so much to get to tonight, but first, here are some scenes from "silver linings playbook." >> what is this i just hear about you getting out from the loony bin? i thought you said you had it together, you were solid? >> i am solid. >> i just want us to be friends. >> i was having sex with everybody in the office. >> everybody? how many you were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> i can only do if i have a partner. >> is this the girl that you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> we are friends. >> went live reaches out with a moment like this, it is a sin if you don't reach back. tavis: i am told you wrote this, but put it on the shelf and then obviously came back to it. that leads to the obvious question, wh
hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: josh gad got a tony nomination, and he is now the star of the commonly "1600 penn," and here is a scene from "1600 penn." >> hi. what if i told you i found a way to combine one of my great passions with an employment opportunity? >> just make sure you thought it through. >> i am going off script now. you know i have got the skills. you have always said, "do what you love, and the money will follow." >> that is not the case with magic. >> what is that? i believe this is yours, sir. do you not want to ask how i did that? tavis: is the obama era at the right time -- i am not making judgment one way or another, but is this the right time for this type of sitcom? >> interestingly enough, the obama administration invited us to screen it. we got their blessing. ironically, the obama speech writer is our head writer, and so i think so. but the interesting thing about it, it is not necessarily a show about politics. it is a show about a family with the backup of politics. tavis: it is the white house.
with your community to make everyday better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the likelihood of dwight henry starring in a critically acclaimed film an award-winning movie could not have been more remote. the small-business owner and new orleans residents not only survived katrina, but they became one of the first businesses to reopen after the storm. the directors of "beast of the southern wild" asked him to star in their movie, and he said no, and now, dwight henry is one of the stars of the film. here are now some scenes of "beast of the southern wild." ♪ tavis: so the first question is, who is baking the good stuff? who is baking cookies when you are going out on tour, talking about your film? >> i have two partners who are holding it down while i go on this press tour. tavis: good to meet you. i just want to jump in because these stories are fascinating to me, how something comes together so organically, and it ends up being such a success that it winds at sundance, it gets all kind of a claim at cannes, it makes a star out of you, but
'm bob abernethy. you can follow us on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's always much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. ♪ >>> major funding is providing by the lily endowment, an minnesota-based private foundation. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designi designing customized individual and group products, and the corporation for public broadcasting.
and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition
together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: malik bendielloul, a documentary filmmaker behind one of the most talked-about documentaries, "searching for sugar man." it tells the remarkable story about rodriguez's remarkable comeback in south africa. the film is of for an oscar this year. here are some scenes. >> if ever there is an air of mystery around a pop artist, it is around the artist known as rodriguez. >> he was a wandering spirit around the city. ♪ >> it is a mystery, but it spread quickly. to many of us south africa as he was the soundtrack of our lives. it was the first who opposition to apartheid. he was a mystery. then we found out he committed suicide, and a lot of people have different versions of the story. i thought it would make a good story. there is nothing on the record to tell us who he was or where he was from, so we started to look at the lyrics. we found him. >> he was doing the work nobody else wanted to do he was a lot of things but not materialistic. >> the next day he says, i have got to go on tour, and we said, wh
and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, scenes of ash wednesday at the vatican, where pope benedict xvi celebrated what is expected to have been his last public mass as pope. ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> announcer: major funding is provided by the lily endowment, an indianapolis-based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the co
techniques and extraordinary rendition. in 2005, brennan said on pbs that he was " intimately familiar" with cases of rendition and that he considered the practice and absolutely vital tool in combating terrorism. this is the interview. >> was secretary rice today when she called it a vital tool in combating terrorism? >> i think it is absolutely vital tool. i have been intimately familiar for the past decade of cases of rendition u.s. government has been involved in, and i can say without a doubt it has been very successful as far as reducing intelligence and saving lives. >> you're saying both in the interests of the streets and in the interrogation? >> yes. rendition is the practice or process of rendering somebody from one place to another place. it is moving them. the u.s. will facilitate. >> why would you not -- if the of the suspect who is a danger to the u.s., why we do not keep them in u.s. custody? is it because we want another country to do the dirty work? >> i don't think that is it at all. i think it is rather arrogant to think that we're the only country that respects hum
can follow us on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, the israeli gospel choir from tel aviv performing at congregation rodeph sholom in new york city. ♪ >> major funding for religion and ethics news weekly is provided by the lilly endowment, dedicated to the founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting.
that it's not really your story. it's a lot of people's story. >> rose: makers runs tomorrow night on pbs. joining me now two women featured in the fill, gloria steinem, she is an icon and a legend in the women's movement. also next generation feminist amy richards. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: great to see you. >> thank you. >> rose: so what question does this film answer? >> well, i would say there are two things, the past. >> rose: yeah. >> and history. and we have been half of the past. and 1% of history. so this is the other half of history. i mean it's not just women's history, it's history. >> rose: do you have a sense that the 21st century is a century for women? >> no, i definitely think so and hope so but of course it does depend on what we do every day. it's not automatic. but i think what is happening now in the second half of the women's movement because they have to last a century, you know to be permanent is that we are gunning to understand the connections. we're beginning to understand that you can't perpetuate racism wit
follow me on twitter @bonnie erbe and @tothecontrary and check our new website, pbs.org/tothecontrary where the discussion continues. whether you agree or think, to the contrary, please join us next time. >> funding for "to the contrary" provided by: the cornell douglas foundation committed to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. for a copy of "to the contrary" please contact federal news service at 1-888-343-1940.
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)